An Updated Look & Upgraded Storage for a 1970’s Kitchen

This original 1970’s kitchen was large and had a lot of available cabinet space that our clients wanted to take full advantage of. Incorporating pull-out drawers in place of the deep lower cabinets has made it significantly easier to access stored items below the counter. Other updates included removing low-hanging soffits from the ceiling, replacing the lighting, installing new flooring, painting the walls and ceiling, and more.

An Updated Look & Upgraded Storage for a 1970’s Kitchen

As the story goes for just about all of the homes we remodel, our recent clients in Arlington, Texas, needed to update their kitchen with a new look and improved functionality. The original 1970’s kitchen wasn’t dysfunctional, but it was certainly dated and lacked the modern storage space the clients realized they needed. The fortunate thing about this project was that the kitchen had good bones – the layout was great and the cabinetry, although out of style, was high-quality; it was in fantastic shape for being 40+ years old! The kitchen itself was large and had a lot of available cabinet space, and our clients really wanted to upgrade the lower cabinets to drawers to take full advantage of it. This might not seem like a big change, but incorporating pull-out drawers in place of deep cabinets makes it significantly easier to access stored items. This is especially helpful as homeowners age, when it gets increasingly difficult to get on your hands and knees to reach stored goods or appliances at the back of the cabinet. Read more

3 Major Contributors to the Cost of Your Home Remodel


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Preparing for your first home remodeling project requires a good bit of research. The first step, of course, is exploring how much your specific project will cost and if it fits within your budget. There is nothing worse than getting your hopes only to find that your dream project isn’t a realistic option financially! Unfortunately, if you’re new to remodeling, you’ll likely be surprised at how much the process actually costs. Even if it’s not a “full gut” or a major renovation, the estimated cost can still be higher than most homeowners expect. One great resource we can provide when it comes to the average cost of various home remodeling projects is this cost vs value report. The report is location-specific and is updated each year, making it a great tool for those in the early research phase of their project. Read more

Law Tigers Hero Ride for Special Olympics Texas

Attention all DFW bikers! Our featured community event this month is for you!

The Law Tigers “Hero Ride for Special Olympics Texas” is coming up on December 2nd! The ride will start at four supporting Harley Davidson Locations across the metroplex (Allen, Garland, Grand Prairie, and Bedford) with all riders ending at AT&T Stadium – home of the Dallas Cowboys! Fee includes a self-guided tour of the Stadium and an afterparty on the field!

Enjoy an afternoon of games, a silent auction, and a live DJ. Motorcycle parking is included. Read more

Our November 2018 Newsletter

 

Our recent clients in Arlington, TX had been waiting for years to remodel their master bathroom. The main issue was the large soaking tub that sat diagonally in the center of the room. The original design featured the tub as a focal point, sitting on a tiled step-up with a large cultured tile surround and decorative columns on each side, extending up to the ceiling. With large mirrors on both walls behind it, there was no ignoring that bathtub! The clients are thrilled to finally have a bathtub they are proud of, along with a completely remodeled bathroom, spacious walk-in shower, and custom vanities. Check out the transformation on our blog! Read more

3 Truths About The Design Phase of Your Home Remodel with Medford Design-Build

 
 

 

 
 
Many homeowners come to us with the initial statement that they already have their remodel figured out – they know how they’d like the floor plan, they know what walls they’d like to remove, they’ve picked out the paint colors, hardware, tile selections, and so on. Some have even gone as far as pre-purchasing their fixtures and appliances before they have even hired a contractor. In those cases, we often hear the phrase “I don’t need design assistance” or “the design isn’t necessary; can’t you just build it?
 
 
While there is absolutely nothing wrong with planning ahead (we completely understand the excitement of it!) most homeowners don’t quite understand everything that goes into a kitchen or bathroom remodel and why the design process is necessary. Remodeling a kitchen or a bathroom without an organized design process would be like having a home builder construct a house without any building plans to go by. Even if the builder is experienced and knowledgeable, odds are that the completed house would not be his best work. Everything from intricate details like plumbing and electrical lines to larger portions like structural supports need to be addressed beforehand to ensure a quality finished product.
 
 
At Medford Design-Build, our design process is tried and true. With over 30 years of experience, our team has ironed out all the details so that nothing is overlooked during this critical phase of your project. Here are some helpful truths about the design phase in home remodeling to help you understand why it’s not something that can be skipped!
 
 
1. The term “design” is not limited to aesthetics.
 
 
In the world of home remodeling, the term “design” tends to make people think of paint colors, textiles, and tile selection; i.e. all of the pretty stuff that ties a room together in the end. Yes, realistic 3D renderings are an essential part of our custom design packages to aid in conceptual and visual understanding for both our team and our clients. We definitely want to make sure we’re all on the same page about how the space will look and function before anyone starts swinging a hammer! However, in some cases, the “design” is not only about the finished look of the project, but also the organization of the design itself. Even if a project doesn’t require visual floor plans or renderings, our Interior Designer, Stephanie, still creates a “design sheet” for every project we do. This document (separate from the Scope of Work document) is a part of the process regardless of whether or not the client has already selected their materials. The reason for this sheet is to list out every part of the design that is to be addressed, to ensure none of the pieces are overlooked. For example, a kitchen design sheet would specify the sink style and model, the drain strainer, the faucet, and the disposal under the “plumbing” section, while the “electrical” section would include details regarding the switch plates and outlets, undercabinet lighting, and fresh air vents that need to be added. Each section covers all of the little details you may not have considered on your own (sometimes as many as 60+ items!) even if you have previously selected all of the larger, more obvious items.
 
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