4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Attempting a DIY Home Remodel

If given the option to hire a remodeler or complete a home renovation themselves, most homeowners would prefer to trust a professional over taking on the job on their own. However, there are always a select few that are up to the challenge. Depending on the size of the project, DIY remodeling may be an achievable task, but it’s a good idea to consider the risks involved before jumping in.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself before opting to remodel on your own:

1. What size is your project?
Most homeowners are comfortable taking on small-scale projects that do not require significant experience or craftsmanship. These types of projects might include replacing an old faucet or installing a light fixture – the kind of projects that might have simple step-by-step tutorials available on YouTube. A good rule of thumb is that if the total cost is expected to be under $1,000.00, it’s most likely a small enough job to handle on your own. Keep in mind this is only the case if you are comfortable with the work and understand each step of the process. If you have fully reviewed available tutorials or read through several how-to’s and you still feel unsure, calling a professional would definitely be the safest route to take. Read more

5 Signs You Should Hire a Professional for Your Home Remodel

With all of the home improvement DIY networks and Pinterest How-to’s, it’s sometimes easy to think you can tackle just about any renovation project on your own. While it may be tempting to take on a major home improvement project to save money, it’s not always wise to do it alone.

Here are five signs that you’ll likely need kitchen remodeling help from a professional:

  1. You’d like to remove that dated popcorn ceiling

Popcorn ceilings were popular in the 1950’s and 60’s as a form of acoustic treatment. In 1978, this method was banned because the treatment contained asbestos, which can cause mesothelioma (a fatal cancer that affects the lining of the lungs). Despite the health risks, the government allowed builders to use up their on-hand materials after the ban was instilled. For that reason, popcorn ceilings installed post-1978 may still contain the carcinogenic material. Read more